State controller wants Ohtani’s taxes.  What about Hunter Biden’s?

Shohei Ohtani could avoid paying tens of millions in California taxes. Not so fast, state says

Congress should narrow a loophole that could spare Shohei Ohtani from paying tens of millions in California taxes, the state controller said Monday.

The Dodgers last month signed Ohtani to a 10-year, $700-million contract, with Ohtani deferring $680 million until after the contract expires in 2033.

By that time, Ohtani could have returned to Japan or moved elsewhere outside California, where he might not be liable for state taxes on the deferrals. That could cost the state an estimated $98 million in tax revenue, according to the California Center for Jobs and the Economy.

“The current tax system allows for unlimited deferrals for those fortunate enough to be in the highest tax brackets, creating a significant imbalance in the tax structure,” Controller Malia Cohen said in a statement Monday. “The absence of reasonable caps on deferral for the wealthiest individuals exacerbates income inequality and hinders the fair distribution of taxes. I would urge Congress to take immediate and decisive action to rectify this imbalance.

“Introducing limits on deductions and exemptions for high-income earners promotes social responsibility and contributes to a tax system that is just and beneficial for all. This action would not only create a more equitable tax system, but also generate additional revenue that can be directed towards addressing pressing important social issues and fostering economic stability.”

Click here to read the full article in the LA Times

Shohei Ohtani’s contract with the Dodgers could come with bonus of mostly avoiding California taxes

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — If $700 million wasn’t enough, Shohei Ohtani’s record-setting contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers could also include a bonus: skipping most of California’s famously high income taxes.

Not even the mighty Dodgers have the power to exempt Ohtani from paying his taxes. But they and the player can control when Ohtani gets paid. The Dodgers will pay Ohtani $20 million over the next decade, when the baseball star will be hitting and, health permitting, pitching for the National League powerhouse.

It’s the decade after that when the Dodgers will really start to pay Ohtani — $68 million per year from 2034-43. Ohtani will turn 40 in 2034, an age when most Major League Baseball players have retired. By then, Ohtani could stop playing baseball and choose not to live in California, potentially avoiding for the bulk of his salary the state’s 13.3% income tax and 1.1% payroll tax for State Disability Insurance.

With 97% of Ohtani’s Dodgers income deferred, it means California — where there is an estimated $68 billion budget deficit this year — will have to wait at least a decade before it can collect taxes on the bulk of his salary, if it can collect at all. California could collect taxes from Ohtani’s significant endorsement deals, assuming Ohtani is a California resident.

It’s impossible to know for sure how much state taxes Ohtani will pay. California law doesn’t let state officials provide information about a single taxpayer. The California Franchise Tax Board — the state agency that collects income taxes — says the amount of income subject to tax payments and the timing of those payments vary depending on the technical details of the contract, which are not publicly available.

But the details of Ohtani’s contract that are publicly known appear to fit nicely within the confines of a federal law that specifically bans states from taxing the retirement incomes of former residents, said Kirk Stark, a law professor at UCLA who specializes in tax law and co-authored a textbook on state and local taxes.

That law, Stark says, applies to deferred compensation arrangements as long as the income is received in substantially equal payments over a period of not less than 10 years. That scenario seems to apply to Ohtani’s contract, meaning he could potentially avoid paying California income taxes were he to live outside of the state once his playing career ends.

“Are they, in fact, doing that? I have no idea. It would require a sort of more granular evaluation of the actual contractual language,” Stark said. “Probably even Ohtani doesn’t even know for sure, other than the lawyers or whoever else was involved in drafting the contract.”

During Thursday’s introductory news conference at Dodger Stadium, Ohtani said he structured the contract to help the Dodgers, not himself. He wants the Dodgers to be free to spend more money on other good players.

Professional athletes’ taxes are also much more complicated than the average taxpayer. In the U.S., people must pay taxes based both on where they live and where they work. That means when the New York Mets play the Dodgers in Los Angeles, Mets players can be taxed for the days they played in California.

Most states have a formula for how to calculate this, known as “jock tax,” according to Jared Walczak, vice president of state projects for the Tax Foundation. It doesn’t apply to states that have no income tax, like Texas, Tennessee and Florida, where many professional athletes move.

Ohtani’s contract highlights the outsized impact California’s wealthy residents have on the state’s finances. Of the state’s more than 39 million residents, only about 8,500 people account for a quarter of the state’s income tax revenue each year. That’s one reason why state budget officials closely monitor the number of companies each year that decide to sell stock to the public — a process that increases the state’s population of millionaires.

“Mr. Ohtani already has and will continue to put up otherworldly numbers on the field, however it is fair to say it will take much more than his remarkable success to close next year’s budget gap,” said H.D. Palmer, spokesman for California’s Department of Finance, said of the state’s estimated multibillion-dollar budget deficit.

The California Center for Jobs and the Economy estimated California could miss out on as much as $98 million in taxes from Ohtani — an estimate based on a lot of assumptions. Brooke Armor, the group’s president, said it would take 317 similar contracts to cover California’s budget deficit.

“That’s a very small number of people, and every time somebody leaves — a high income earner — the budget feels it,” she said. “It just shows the volatility and fragility of the state’s revenue system.”

Chris Hoene, executive director of the California Budget and Policy Center, said it’s only fair for the wealthy to pay more in taxes than people with lower incomes.

Click here to read the full article in AP News

Two-way superstar Shohei Ohtani joining Dodgers on record $700-million deal

The Shohei Ohtani sweepstakes are over.

The Dodgers, as they had long dreamed, held the winning ticket.

In a blockbuster announcement Saturday, Ohtani agreed to a 10-year, $700-millioncontract with the Dodgers, according to a statement posted on Instagram, bringing the two-time most valuable player across town after his historic six-year stint with the Angels.

“To all the fans and everyone involved in the baseball world, I apologize for taking so long to come to a decision,” Ohtani said in his Instagram post. “I have decided to choose the Dodgers as my next team.”

With the Dodgers, the 29-year-old Ohtani will now become an instant face of the franchise, as well as the highest-paid player in MLB history, with his record-breaking contract shattering Mike Trout’s previous high of $426.5 million.

The deal is also believed to be the largest in sports history, surpassing even the reported totals of such soccer superstars as Lionel Messi and Kylian Mbappe.

The majority of Ohtani’s contract will be paid out in “unprecedented” deferrals, according to a person with knowledge of the contract who was unauthorized to speak publicly and granted anonymity.

The deferrals were Ohtani’s idea, per the source. Such a structure — where most of the money will be paid out after the 10 seasons — should provide Ohtani with some tax benefits, but will more importantly ease potential year-to-year payroll and luxury tax complications of having a single player make $70 million annually. The primary goal of the deferrals, according to the source, was about allowing the team to be successful on the field.

The agreement includes no opt outs, said another person with knowledge of the deal unauthorized to speak publicly.

“This is a unique, historic contract for a unique, historic player,“ said Nez Balelo of CAA Sports, Ohtani’s agent. “Shohei is thrilled to be a part of the Dodgers organization. He is excited to begin this partnership, and he structured his contract to reflect a true commitment from both sides to long-term success.”

Ohtani broke the news on his Instagram account a day after conflicting reports suggested he was on the verge of signing with the Toronto Blue Jays. The silence his camp maintained made tracking his intentions difficult.

“First of all, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to everyone involved with the Angels organization and the fans who have supported me over the past six years, as well as to everyone involved with each team that was part of this negotiation process,” Ohtani said in his post. “Especially to the Angels fans who supported me through all the ups and downs, your guys’ support and cheer meant the world to me. The six years I spent with the Angels will remain etched in my heart forever.”

The deal is also believed to be the largest in sports history, surpassing even the reported totals of such soccer superstars as Lionel Messi and Kylian Mbappe.

The majority of Ohtani’s contract will be paid out in “unprecedented” deferrals, according to a person with knowledge of the contract who was unauthorized to speak publicly and granted anonymity.

The deferrals were Ohtani’s idea, per the source. Such a structure — where most of the money will be paid out after the 10 seasons — should provide Ohtani with some tax benefits, but will more importantly ease potential year-to-year payroll and luxury tax complications of having a single player make $70 million annually. The primary goal of the deferrals, according to the source, was about allowing the team to be successful on the field.

The agreement includes no opt outs, said another person with knowledge of the deal unauthorized to speak publicly.

“This is a unique, historic contract for a unique, historic player,“ said Nez Balelo of CAA Sports, Ohtani’s agent. “Shohei is thrilled to be a part of the Dodgers organization. He is excited to begin this partnership, and he structured his contract to reflect a true commitment from both sides to long-term success.”

Ohtani broke the news on his Instagram account a day after conflicting reports suggested he was on the verge of signing with the Toronto Blue Jays. The silence his camp maintained made tracking his intentions difficult.

“First of all, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to everyone involved with the Angels organization and the fans who have supported me over the past six years, as well as to everyone involved with each team that was part of this negotiation process,” Ohtani said in his post. “Especially to the Angels fans who supported me through all the ups and downs, your guys’ support and cheer meant the world to me. The six years I spent with the Angels will remain etched in my heart forever.”

The deal is also believed to be the largest in sports history, surpassing even the reported totals of such soccer superstars as Lionel Messi and Kylian Mbappe.

The majority of Ohtani’s contract will be paid out in “unprecedented” deferrals, according to a person with knowledge of the contract who was unauthorized to speak publicly and granted anonymity.

The deferrals were Ohtani’s idea, per the source. Such a structure — where most of the money will be paid out after the 10 seasons — should provide Ohtani with some tax benefits, but will more importantly ease potential year-to-year payroll and luxury tax complications of having a single player make $70 million annually. The primary goal of the deferrals, according to the source, was about allowing the team to be successful on the field.

The agreement includes no opt outs, said another person with knowledge of the deal unauthorized to speak publicly.

“This is a unique, historic contract for a unique, historic player,“ said Nez Balelo of CAA Sports, Ohtani’s agent. “Shohei is thrilled to be a part of the Dodgers organization. He is excited to begin this partnership, and he structured his contract to reflect a true commitment from both sides to long-term success.”

Ohtani broke the news on his Instagram account a day after conflicting reports suggested he was on the verge of signing with the Toronto Blue Jays. The silence his camp maintained made tracking his intentions difficult.

“First of all, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to everyone involved with the Angels organization and the fans who have supported me over the past six years, as well as to everyone involved with each team that was part of this negotiation process,” Ohtani said in his post. “Especially to the Angels fans who supported me through all the ups and downs, your guys’ support and cheer meant the world to me. The six years I spent with the Angels will remain etched in my heart forever.”

A week before the winter meetings, industry buzz suggested the Chicago Cubs were making a big push, perhaps in an effort to pair their new blockbuster managerial hire of Craig Counsell with an even bigger splash by landing the game’s biggest star.

Then, over the course of the winter meetings, an apparent list of finalists came into focus, including the incumbent Angels, Cubs, San Francisco Giants and Blue Jays most of all — crescendoing Friday night when inaccurate reports (and private-jet tracking internet sleuths) suggested Ohtani was en route to Toronto to sign with them.

Despite fears that leaks of information during his free agency could be held against teams, Ohtani’s meetings with the Dodgers, Giants and Blue Jays — each held within a four-day span leading up to the winter meetings — all became public knowledge in the days before his signing.

Roberts even disclosed the Dodgers’ meeting with Ohtani during his press availability at the winter meetings, making him the only team official in the league to publicly confirm a meeting with the two-way star.

Click here to read the full article in LA Times

Steve Garvey: The Republican Wild Card

Garvey now ahead of Lee, moving close to a vital second place in polling for the Senate race

Since January, almost all the coverage of the 2024 U.S. Senate race has been on three major candidates: Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA),  Congresswoman Katie Porter (D-CA), and  Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA) . They have been by far the top candidates in terms of donations, endorsements, and where they place in polls. Other Democrats have occasionally made headlines, such as former tech executive Lexi Reese who has been a masterful fundraiser, but in polls they generally don’t go above 2 or 3 percent.

For the first three quarters of the year, GOP candidates didn’t do much better than those tertiary Democrats. Lawyer Eric Early did have an impressive early poll lead in the double digits, but has since settled in to single digit territory. He also has by far the most endorsements amongst any Republican, albeit with most coming from County Republican organization. Businessman James Bradley also made waves by moving ahead of Early in some polls, but as they have each gotten an average of between 3 and 7 points in every poll since June, it’s not saying all that much. While both are good candidates, the GOP needed a name candidate who could fundraise and go the distance against the top three Democrats.

While often rumored as a candidate, it wasn’t until early last month that the GOP got a candidate who could potentially scuttle the all-Democrat path ahead – former Los Angeles Dodger and San Diego Padre all-star Steve Garvey. While not as big a name as other celebrity California Republican politicians of the past like Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sonny Bono, Garvey came in with dedicated bases of support in LA and San Diego, as well as more offbeat blocs of support, such as those from baseball fans, that could reach beyond party lines and attract the coveted independent and undecided voters.

Many Democrats dismissed Garvey as just another Republican entering the race last month. According to some experts the Globe talked with on Wednesday, Democrats saw him as just another minor dent in the number of votes going to someone other than Porter, Schiff, or Lee.

“He was seen as just another Early or Bradley, but with maybe another point or two in the polls because of his fundraising experience,” said said Matt Saunders, a political consultant who helps advise candidates from entertainment and athletic fields, to the Globe.

However, in the last month, Garvey has quickly not only become the top Republican in the race, but one of the top candidates period. The last two major polls have shown Garvey in third place with 10% of the vote, now ahead of Lee, one of the three major Democrats. As of the latest poll, he is only six points behind Schiff and three points, the margin-of-error, behind Porter.

With Garvey now a bona fide force to be reckoned with, Democrats have now begun shifting rhetoric away from each other and back towards the GOP. However, either way is going to prove harmful to the Democrats in the long-term.

Garvey and the GOP

“Either way, Democrats are going to lose face here,” added Stephanie Lewis, a pollster in Southern California. “They get two Dem candidates in, and those two are going to waste tens of millions going after each other through most of 2024 and show just how divided Democrats are. If it is one Democrat against Garvey, yeah they still get the seat unless something crazy happens, but they are hurt because they beat out a few of their golden candidates. Oh, and if [Garvey] does well enough, it could show the Democrats losing ground overall.”

For the GOP, the next few months are critical in the lead up to the March primary. While a win in November 2024 is extremely difficult, a win in March is becoming more and more likely. And there are several signs to watch for.

“One is the polls,” continued Saunders. “Gotta keep an eye on them. Garvey has been moving up, and if he starts getting into that second place territory, both Schiff and Porter, who have sunk a ton of money and their future political careers into this, are not going to be happy.

“Two is fundraising. New SEC totals for the quarter will come out in December, and where Garvey stands with money will be critical. To be competitive he needs at least as much as Lee, so we are talking at least a million dollars. Schiff and Porter have a bunch more, but he can also easily rack up more donations as needed. He just needs that threshold and a big number to draw in support.

“Speaking of, three is bringing in more support. Getting more from the GOP is good, but he needs more branching out to independents, undecideds, and maybe some one the fence baseball fans. You said getting former teammates involved could help, and yeah, it can. If he can reach out to Latinos especially, he can get a solid boost of support. Female voters are big for him too to get, and there he can work in his non-profit experience to draw more in.

Click here to read the full article in the California Globe

‘Save Our Children!’: Thousands Block the Entrance to Dodger Stadium to Protest ‘Pride Night’ Celebration

Thousands of Catholics gathered outside Dodger Stadium on Friday to protest the team’s “Pride Night” celebration, where they plan to honor the anti-Catholic group Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence.

And it wasn’t long before the crowd of protesters grew so large that they blocked one of the major entrances to the stadium.

The Dodgers’ tenth annual “Pride Night” celebration will honor the anti-Catholic drag queen group with its “Community Hero Award” Friday night during a game against the visiting San Francisco Giants.

The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence are a “leading-edge Order of queer and trans nuns,” according to the organization’s website.

After receiving backlash from religious groups, the Dodgers rescinded an invitation to the radical anti-Christian organization. However, the Dodgers walked back its decision and announced that the drag queen group would be re-invited to the team’s Pride Night.

The Dodgers offered its “sincerest apologies to the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, members of the LGBTQ+ community, and their friends and families” in a statement issued after the announcement.

“A full apology and explanation was given to us by the Dodgers staff which we accept,” the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence said in a statement. “We believe the apology is sincere because the Dodgers have worked for 10 years with our community and as well they have asked us to continue an ongoing relationship with them.”

A crowd of reportedly more than 1,000 protesters gathered outside the stadium hours before the game started to protest the team’s decision to honor the anti-Catholic group.

The crowd could be heard praying, “Jesus, I trust in you,” according to a video uploaded to Twitter by Turning Point USA reporter Savanah Hernandez.

Jack Posobiec leads the crowd of hundreds outside Dodgers Stadium in a Latin prayer. pic.twitter.com/ok7XWf0pa4

— The Post Millennial (@TPostMillennial) June 16, 2023

At one point, a Jewish rabbi took the stage to stand in solitary with the Catholic protesters.

“If you are anti-Catholic, you’re anti-religion, you’re anti-God, I got a problem with that,” the rabbi said.

Click here to read the full article in BreitbartCA

CA Senate Honoring The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence in LGBTQ Recognition Ceremony

Most of the state’s Democrat politicians have been driven to distraction by social and emotional causes, rather than governing and policymaking

On June 5 the California Senate will be holding a LGBTQ recognition ceremony. One of the honorees is Sister Roma from the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence group.

Yes, that Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence group, recently embroiled in controversy with the Los Angeles Dodgers. “The Dodgers invited The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence to receive an award in an on-field ceremony at Pride Night and that did not sit well with many—especially the more conservative members of the Catholic Church,” the Globe reported. The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence is a drag queen group who dress as Catholic nuns, and in their own words, “…use humor and irreverent wit to expose the forces of bigotry, complacency and guilt that chain the human spirit.”

Roma also co-hosts an online talk showThe Tim and Roma Show, that focuses on gay pornographic movies and the LGBT community.”

The LA Dodgers invited the Sisters, disinvited them after public outcry, then reinvited them, resulting in the pro-baseball team earning the title, “Bud Light of Baseball.”

According to the American Council Quorum, a public policy group for the faith community, “The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence self-identity as an Order of queer and trans nuns, but they are really a Catholic hate group who mocks Christian figures, beliefs, and doctrines in sexualized dances, photo-ops, and events. In a recent video that surfaced online, this group of trans-men featured a kinky drag-queen Jesus in a thong along with drag nuns, defiling a sincere Christian image.”

This is the video on Instagram.

Indeed. In April to “celebrate” Easter, “The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, the worldwide troupe of nondenominational drag nuns founded in San Francisco in 1979, has announced that their Hunky Jesus and Foxy Mary contests will once again return to Dolores Park, along with the annual Easter Bonnet contest that’s open to everyone,” the SF Standard reported. “Many people believe Jesus died for their sins, but in San Francisco, a bunch of Jesuses dye their beards for our amusement.”

This is the group the California Senate will be honoring in a LGBTQ recognition ceremony (Senate request at the end of this article).

For context in the Dodgers debacle, CatholicVote posted this Twitter response:

The @Dodgers’ announcement today is the equivalent of putting a Band-Aid on a gaping wound and in no way diminishes the harm and hurt caused by their plan to honor a vile anti-Catholic organization. Creating a “faith and family” event does not balance the decision to honor a perverted, fake “nun” group that exists to mock the Catholic religion. In many ways, it emphasizes the contrast, and makes our case even stronger. It’s hard to interpret this announcement as anything other than a public relations stunt intended to blunt the widespread national backlash that is only growing stronger. The Dodgers have one path forward: apologize and stop honoring hateful anti-Catholic organizations.

Politics in California today is anything but, as most of the state’s Democrat politicians have been driven to distraction by social and emotional causes, rather than governing and policymaking for the good of the people of their districts, and the good of the people of the state.

Assemblyman Ting from San Francisco might want to focus on his city in decline instead.

Leadership comes from the top, and at the top in California is Gov. Gavin Newsom, the chief of distraction. Newsom has been making headlines daily for months, focused on everything but the screaming disaster that is California.

Here is a sampling of the hot mess Newsom and the state’s Democrats have made in California, which was once the land of opportunity:

  • California is home to one-third of the nations’ welfare recipients and has the highest poverty;
  • Our failing schools now rank 48th in the country;
  • California lawmakers can’t build new homes or apartments for less than $800,000 each (luxury level costs);
  • The governor and lawmakers can’t figure out what to do with several hundred thousand drug-addicted, mentally ill homeless vagrants living on city streets and taking over public parks;
  • California lawmakers refuse to build additional reservoirs for water storage in a state in which drought conditions are historically normal, and now has a regular wildfire “season;”
  • California lawmakers and governor mandated all electric vehicles within a few years, but can’t keep the power on during heat spells and winter storms;
  • Lawmakers authorized more than $25 million worth of taxpayer-funded guaranteed income to some individuals in the state, but can’t really tell you why;
  • Proposed $800 billion in reparations payments to African-Americans, despite that California was never a slave state;
  • California has a $34 billion deficit—and it’s growing;
  • The state’s $100+ billion high-speed rail project is mostly dormant;
  • California has the highest income tax rates in the nation;
  • California also has the highest sales taxes, electricity rates, gas taxes in the country.

Victor Davis Hanson recently and poignantly summarized the decline of California:

“Crime, homelessness, and medieval decay characterize the once great downtowns of San Francisco and Los Angeles. It is now not safe to walk alone in any major California city after dark.”

“Shoplifting and smash-and-grab theft are no longer treated as real crimes. The result is the mass flight of brand stores from our downtowns and inner cities, with all the accustomed cries of “racism,” even as racist public prosecutors pick and choose whether to indict the arrested on the basis of race.

“California infrastructure, once the best in the county, is now among the worst. Decaying and crowded freeways, inadequate water storage, and pot-holed streets are the new norm. Once robust gas, oil, mining, and timber industries are nearly inert.”

Sacramento, we have a problem.

Click here to read the full article in the California Globe

‘The Dodgers Have Become the Bud Light of Baseball’: CatholicVote Blasts Dodgers for Caving to Anti-Catholic Drag Queens

The Los Angeles Dodgers have indeed proven themselves to be the “Bud Light of Baseball” after backing down to the woke and reinviting the radical, anti-Christian gay and transgender group, the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, to their Pride Night on June 16.

Now that the Dodgers have reversed its decision to disinvite the hate group from its gay pride night after acquiescing to Christians who were outraged that the group was set to get a community award at the game, Christians are again mounting efforts to denounce the team for reinviting the LGBTQ group to the game.

CatholicVote is vowing to resume its campaign to pressure the Dodgers to distance itself from the hate group after the team went groveling back to reinvite them to their June 16 game.

“After the Los Angeles Dodgers on Monday reinvited an anti-Catholic hate group to be honored at the team’s June 16 LGBTQ+ Pride Night, CatholicVote President Brian Burch vowed to launch a “barrage” of advertising against the team across Los Angeles and in game broadcasts,” the group said in a Monday press release.

“This is a slap in the face of every Catholic,” Burch added. “We’re raising $1 million as fast as we can, and we will pummel this decision in advertising that the Dodgers can’t ignore.”

“Every advertiser, every season ticket holder, every charity, every fan must speak out against the Dodgers’ decision to promote anti-Catholic hate,” Burch said. “Why does ‘pride’ have to include honoring the most grotesque and scandalous anti-Catholic perverts?”

CatholicVote’s decision comes after the team proudly announced that it was awarding the Sisters with its community Hero Award during its forthcoming June 16 gay pride night event.

The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence is known for dressing in drag queen-inspired nun outfits to mock Catholics, including at pro-abortion rallies, according to Fox News. Dressed as nuns, the group attends parades to push the radical gay agenda.

Catholic League president Bill Donohue blasted the team for “promoting bigotry, not fighting it” with its obscene award for the anti-Catholic group.

“These homosexual bigots are known for simulating sodomy while dressed as nuns,” Donohue said. “They like to feature a ‘Condom Savior Mass,’ one that describes how the ‘Latex Host is the flesh for the life of the world.’”

Donohue also noted that the group also calls itself “Sister Homo Fellatio” and “Sister Joyous Reserectum” and pointed out that “only last month, the group held an event mocking the Virgin Mary and Jesus on Easter Sunday.”

After pressure from Christians, the team announced it had heard their concerns and decided to disinvite the radical hate group from its gay pride night festivities.

“Given the strong feelings of people who have been offended by the sisters’ inclusion in our evening, and in an effort not to distract from the great benefits that we have seen over the years of Pride Night, we are deciding to remove them from this year’s group of honorees,” MLB said in a statement.

However, since the announcement disinviting the group from the June 16 game, the extreme gay lobby jumped into action to excoriate the team for the move. The campaign from the gay groups spurred the team to make yet another decision, this time to reinvite the Sisters to the gay pride night.

The team put out a defiant statement enshrined in rainbow colors.

Click here to read the full article in BreitbartCA

Vin Scully, Iconic Former Los Angeles Dodgers Broadcaster, Dies at Age 94

Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully, whose dulcet tones provided the soundtrack of summer while entertaining and informing Dodgers fans in Brooklyn and Los Angeles for 67 years, died Tuesday night, the team said. He was 94.

“We have lost an icon,” Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement. “Vin Scully was one of the greatest voices in all of sports. He was a giant of a man, not only as a broadcaster, but as a humanitarian. He loved people. He loved life. He loved baseball and the Dodgers. And he loved his family. His voice will always be heard and etched in all of our minds forever. I know he was looking forward to joining the love of his life, Sandi. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family during this very difficult time. Vin will be truly missed.”

Scully died at his home in the Hidden Hills section of Los Angeles, according to the team, which spoke to family members. No cause of death was provided.

“Today we mourn the loss of a legend in our game,” Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. “Vin was an extraordinary man whose gift for broadcasting brought joy to generations of Dodger fans. In addition, his voice played a memorable role in some of the greatest moments in the history of our sport. I am proud that Vin was synonymous with Baseball because he embodied the very best of our National Pastime. As great as he was as a broadcaster, he was equally great as a person.

“On behalf of Major League Baseball, I extend my deepest condolences to Vin’s family, friends, Dodger fans and his admirers everywhere.”

As the longest-tenured broadcaster with a single team in pro sports history, Scully saw it all and called it all. He began in the 1950s era of Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson, on to the 1960s with Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax, into the 1970s with Steve Garvey and Don Sutton, and through the 1980s with Orel Hershiser and Fernando Valenzuela. In the 1990s, it was Mike Piazza and Hideo Nomo, followed by Clayton Kershaw, Manny Ramirez and Yasiel Puig in the 21st century.

“He was the best there ever was,” Kershaw said after the Dodgers’ game Tuesday night in San Francisco. “Just when you think about the Dodgers, there’s a lot of history here and a lot of people that have come through. It’s just a storied franchise all the way around. But it almost starts with Vin, honestly.

“Just such a special man. I’m grateful and thankful I got to know him as well as I did.”

Tweeted Puig: “You gave me my Wild Horse name. You gave me love. You hugged me like a father. I will never forget you, my heart is broken.”

The Dodgers changed players, managers, executives, owners — and even coasts — but Scully and his soothing, insightful style remained a constant for the fans.

He opened broadcasts with the familiar greeting, “Hi, everybody, and a very pleasant good evening to you wherever you may be.”

Ever gracious both in person and on the air, Scully considered himself merely a conduit between the game and the fans.

After the Dodgers’ 9-5 win in San Francisco at Oracle Park — where in October 2016 Scully broadcast the final game of his career — a tribute to him was shown on the videoboard.

Fans of both teams stopped and applauded Scully before exiting.

“There’s not a better storyteller, and I think everyone considers him family,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “He was in our living rooms for many generations. He lived a fantastic life, a legacy that will live on forever.”

Although he was paid by the Dodgers, Scully was unafraid to criticize a bad play or a manager’s decision or praise an opponent while spinning stories against a backdrop of routine plays and noteworthy achievements. He always said he wanted to see things with his eyes, not his heart.

“He had a voice & a way of storytelling that made you think he was only talking to you,” former Lakers great Magic Johnson, a part owner of the Dodgers, tweeted. “Vin was the nicest & sweetest man outside of the booth & was beloved by all of our Dodgers family.”

Jaime Jarrin, the Spanish voice of the Dodgers and a Hall of Fame broadcaster as well, mourned the loss of his counterpart, writing on Twitter: “We’ve lost the greatest chronicler of baseball and any sport. I’ve lost the architect of my professional life, a beloved friend: Vin Scully. I’m experiencing how difficult it is to put my thoughts together now and all I can say is rest in peace, we’ll see each other again soon.”

Vincent Edward Scully was born Nov. 29, 1927, in the Bronx. He was the son of a silk salesman who died of pneumonia when Scully was 7. His mother moved the family to Brooklyn, where the red-haired, blue-eyed Scully grew up playing stickball in the streets.

As a child, Scully would grab a pillow, put it under the family’s four-legged radio and lay his head directly under the speaker to hear whatever college football game was on the air. With a snack of saltine crackers and a glass of milk nearby, the boy was transfixed by the crowd’s roar that raised goosebumps. He thought he would like to call the action himself.

Scully, who played outfield for two years on the Fordham baseball team and briefly served in the U.S. Navy, began his career by working baseball, football and basketball games for the university’s radio station.

At age 22, he was hired by a CBS radio affiliate in Washington. He soon joined Hall of Famer Red Barber and Connie Desmond in the Brooklyn Dodgers’ radio and television booths. In 1953, at age 25, Scully became the youngest person to broadcast a World Series game, an achievement that still stands.

Scully moved West with the Dodgers in 1958. Scully called three perfect games — Don Larsen’s in the 1956 World Series, Koufax’s in 1965 and Dennis Martinez’s in 1991 — and 20 no-hitters.

He also was on the air when Drysdale set his scoreless innings streak of 58⅔ innings in 1968 and again when Hershiser broke the record with 59 consecutive scoreless innings 20 years later.

When Hank Aaron hit his 715th home run to break Babe Ruth’s record in 1974, it was against the Dodgers and, of course, Scully called it.

“A Black man is getting a standing ovation in the Deep South for breaking a record of an all-time baseball idol,” Scully told listeners. “What a marvelous moment for baseball.”

Scully credited the birth of the transistor radio as “the greatest single break” of his career. Fans had trouble recognizing the lesser players during the Dodgers’ first four years in the vast Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

“They were 70 or so odd rows away from the action,” he said in 2016. “They brought the radio to find out about all the other players and to see what they were trying to see down on the field.”

That habit carried over when the team moved to Dodger Stadium in 1962. Fans held radios to their ears, and those not present listened from home or the car, allowing Scully to connect generations of families with his words.

He often said it was best to describe a big play quickly and then be quiet so fans could listen to the pandemonium. After Koufax’s perfect game in 1965, Scully went silent for 38 seconds before talking again. He was similarly silent for a time after Kirk Gibson’s pinch-hit home run to win Game 1 of the 1988 World Series.

Scully was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982, received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame that year and had the stadium’s press box named for him in 2001. The street leading to Dodger Stadium’s main gate was named in his honor in 2016.

That same year, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama.

“God has been so good to me to allow me to do what I’m doing,” Scully, a devout Catholic who attended Mass on Sundays before heading to the ballpark, said before retiring. “A childhood dream that came to pass and then giving me 67 years to enjoy every minute of it. That’s a pretty large Thanksgiving Day for me.”

In addition to being the voice of the Dodgers, Scully called play-by-play for NFL games and PGA Tour events as well as calling 25 World Series and 12 All-Star Games. He was NBC’s lead baseball announcer from 1983 to 1989.

Scully also received the Commissioner’s Historic Achievement Award, which recognizes accomplishments and contributions of historical significance, in 2014. He became just the second non-player to receive the award, joining Rachel Robinson.

While being one of the most widely heard broadcasters in the nation, Scully was an intensely private man. Once the baseball season ended, he would disappear. He rarely did personal appearances or sports talk shows and preferred spending time with his family.

In 1972, his first wife, Joan, died of an accidental overdose of medicine. He was left with three young children. Two years later, he met the woman who would become his second wife, Sandra, a secretary for the Los Angeles Rams. She had two young children from a previous marriage, and they combined their families into what Scully once called “my own Brady Bunch.”

He said he realized time was the most precious thing in the world and that he wanted to use his time to spend with his loved ones. In the early 1960s, Scully quit smoking with the help of his family. In the shirt pocket where he kept a pack of cigarettes, Scully stuck a family photo. Whenever he felt like he needed a smoke, he pulled out the photo to remind him why he quit. Eight months later, Scully never smoked again.

After retiring in 2016, Scully made just a handful of appearances at Dodger Stadium and his sweet voice was heard narrating an occasional video played during games. Mostly, he was content to stay close to home.

“I just want to be remembered as a good man, an honest man, and one who lived up to his own beliefs,” he said in 2016.

Click here to read the full article at ESPN.com

Dodgers Advance to World Series!

For the second year in a row, the Dodgers have emerged victorious in the National League and will advance to the World Series, where they will take on the Boston Red Sox.

After coming up short in Game 7 last year in heartbreaking fashion, the Dodgers are looking to capture their first title in 30 years. All of Los Angeles will be rooting them on as they attempt to bring a championship home to California.

ESPN Senior Writer David Schoenfield provides a viewers guide to the 2018 World Series:

http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/25049672/mlb-world-series-viewer-guide-boston-red-sox-los-angeles-dodgers

Dodgers_Greats

 

Here are all the sports events California state lawmakers attended for free

As reported by the Los Angeles Times:

Being an elected official in California has its perks. Want proof? Consider all the free tickets to sporting events that members of the Legislature accepted last year as gifts from utilities, unions, law firms and other firms.

Among the top gifts disclosed on annual forms members of the state Assembly and Senate are required to file: Game 5 of the National League Division Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Mets.

Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León was at the deciding game in Dodgers Stadium thanks to a $556 ticket — half of it paid for by a political consulting group and the other half by a downtown Los Angeles law firm.

Bay Area Assemblyman Rob Bonta got $460 tickets to see the Golden State Warriors beat the Houston Rockets and advance to the …

Click here to read the full story