Florida Judge Declares CDC’s Federal Travel Mask Mandate ‘Unlawful’ and Vacates It

“Our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully even in pursuit of desirable ends,” writes Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle.

A Florida judge has vacated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) mask mandate for transportation, calling it an “unlawful” expansion of federal authority.

“Our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully even in pursuit of desirable ends,” wrote U.S. District Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle, who was appointed during the Trump administration.

Mizelle’s ruling brings an immediate halt to the mandate, though the government could ask the court to stay the judgment while an appeal is made. Under that scenario, the travel mandate—which applies to airplanes, trains, buses, and subway systems—could return.

In either case, it’s not clear how much longer the CDC planned to keep the mandate. It was initially set to expire today, but the agency extended it for two additional weeks. Given that the air quality on airplanes is highly filtered, the CEOs of major airlines have testified that the mask requirement is unnecessary for their industry.

“It makes no sense that people are still required to wear masks on airplanes, yet are allowed to congregate in crowded restaurants, schools and at sporting events without masks, despite none of these venues having the protective air filtration system that aircraft do,” wrote the CEOs of all major airlines in a letter to the Biden administration.

They certainly have a point. It’s difficult to imagine that unmasked travelers and commuters are at significantly greater risk of catching COVID-19 than unmasked restaurant and gym customers: There’s much less talking and heavy breathing on an airplane than there is at a bar—but the latter has practically no masking requirements at this point in the pandemic. In most respects, people are now free to decide for themselves what their personal risk tolerance is with respect to COVID-19 and behave accordingly.

In her decision, Judge Mizelle chided the CDC for taking shortcuts and exceeding its own statutory authority. Under the law—specifically, a federal law known as the Administrative Procedures Act—the agency is required to submit new policies for outside review and comment. The CDC declined to do this, arguing that any delay in implementing the mandate would cost lives. The agency also maintained that the mandate was not a new rule but, rather, a clarification of previous guidance relating to “sanitation.”

Mizelle was unpersuaded, however, that the Public Health Service Act of 1944—the law the CDC cited as giving the agency the power to take such actions—considered disease prevention to be a form of sanitation.

“Wearing a mask cleans nothing,” wrote Mizelle. “At most, it traps virus droplets. But it neither ‘sanitizes’ the person wearing the mask nor ‘sanitizes’ the conveyance. Because the CDC required mask wearing as a measure to keep something clean—explaining that it limits the spread of COVID-19 through prevention, but never contending that it actively destroys or removes it—the Mask Mandate falls outside of [applicable law].”

Click here to read the full article at Reason

Health Warnings About Zika Virus Increase — 5 Californians Infected

As reported by the San Bernardino Sun:

Concern about Zika virus arriving to the United States from abroad rose Tuesday after federal health officials posted additional travel alerts about two more countries affected by the mosquito-borne disease.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention included the United States Virgin Islands and Dominican Republic on the list of now two dozen countries and territories where Zika has been present. Last week, the CDC advised pregnant women to avoid travel to Central American, South American and Caribbean countries, including Puerto Rico.

There is no evidence of any local transmission of the Zika virus in the United States federal officials said, but it has been reported in travelers returning home. Five people in California who had traveled abroad came down with the virus, beginning in 2013, state health officials said. One adolescent girl from Los Angeles County, who had traveled …

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