New ‘Porn-in-Schools Toolkit’ Offers Help for Parents

CRI created a ‘how-to’ guide to get obscene books out of school libraries and classrooms

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In 2019, the California State Board of Education approved highly controversial changes to the state’s health and sex education framework including teaching children about bondage, anal sex, pederasty, sex trafficking, sexual orientation and transgender and non-conforming students, the Globe reported.

Notably, California has the nation’s lowest literacy rate, and the California State Board of Education is focused on teaching inappropriate sex to young children.

Across the country, parents have protested the exposure of their children to obscene, pornographic books grooming their children, in school libraries and classrooms. At issue is exposing children to sexually explicit materials without parental knowledge or consent or ability to opt out.

The mainstream media claims parents are demanding book banning.

USA Today reported:

The two most challenged books on the American Library Association’s top 10 list have been in the news often: Maia Kobabe’s graphic novel memoir about sexual identity, “Gender Queer,”and Jonathan Evison’s “Lawn Boy,” a coming-of-age novel narrated by a young gay man. Both have been singled out by Republican officials.

However, even with heightened media attention and endless examples of schools trampling on parental rights, pornographic text books and library books are still in schools, and continue to be aggressively pushed on children by radical activists.

The Globe spoke with Karen England, President of the Capitol Resource Institute who said parents may still think that this is not happening in their schools, but it is.

Capitol Resource Institute has created a BookCheck toolkit to assist parents through the process of removing obscene, sexually graphic and pornographic materials from their public schools.

Most parents don’t know that 43 states have passed obscenity exemption laws that eliminate any liability associated with using these graphic materials if they are employed for “educational” purposes, as part of courses of instruction, or if they are in libraries in K-12 schools, England said. “Distribution of this material off school grounds would be considered criminal, but exposing our children to it during school hours is somehow deemed ‘educational.’”

We discussed some of the books allowed in schools:

Lawn Boy: featured on MSNBC’s Ali Velshi  Banned Books Club, Lawn Boy is billed as a “coming-of-age story,” but is filled with graphic sex acts between children. The interview with Lawn Boy author is just bizarre. The author insists he uses “course language” throughout the book, and not “graphic language.”

More than 35 school districts in 20 states temporarily removed “Lawn Boy” from library shelves.

Since then, many states have passed legislation addressing pornographic, obscene school textbooks and library books.

Trans+: Love, Sex, Romance, and Being You: Amazon describes Trans+ this way: “A groundbreaking all-inclusive, uncensored, must-have guide for teens who are living in this world, who identify as transgender, nonbinary, gender non-conforming, gender fluid, or are questioning their gender identity or how they express themselves, and for their cis-allies and advocates.”

The book contains 75 QR codes, marked as “resources” which take children to unbelievably graphic obscene sex websites. CRI posted a short video on Instagram showing where the links take children. Warning: video it contains obscenity and pornographic images. England says Trans+ is available in school libraries across the country.

PUSH: Graphic descriptions of rape/sex by a teen girl who has been raped for years by her father.

The Globe reported on “Gender Queer: A Memoir” last year, a book found in school libraries across the country which has cartoon drawings of oral sex, masturbation, and describes how to use sex toys.

This alarming trend in public education pushes inappropriate sexual materials to students, and in many cases in the curriculum, teaches kids to use gender pronouns, cartoon books encouraging homosexuality and transgenderism, cartoons showing graphic sexual encounters between teen boys and trans students, and cross-dressing, among other behaviors.

“The sustained and coordinated effort to include pornographic material in K-12 public
schools is a multi-faceted issue,” England said, “but the most important thing you need to know now is that these graphic materials are more than likely already in your county library, your public-school library, and/or they are being used in your child’s classroom.”

To help get parents get started, CRI lists the American Library Association’s list of the most challenged books. They note the American Library Association is not on parents’ side. “The ALA’s goal is to use your child in their social experiment meant to indoctrinate the
next generation.”

“As an organization, CRI is fully committed to help parents and other concerned citizens remove pornographic books from all school and classroom libraries and thus end the practice of exposing minors to inappropriate, sexualized content in the school setting.”

Click here to read the full article in the California Globe

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